Vanilla Noir

Nubile Carly had learnt to use her coquettish charms to great effect. She had captured the heart of Professor Loic a confirmed bachelor, whose love for the classics in vanilla and black was world-renowned. A turbulent affair led to marriage but young Carly was not one to be tied down. She faked her death and made the professor believe that she was reincarnated as Madame Verdoux dressed exquisitely in Chantilly lace. Many a night, young Carly would dress like Carlo to get a glimpse of the professor staring adoringly at Madame Verdoux.But the Monsieur was no fool, he let the deception continue for he had truly fallen in love with Madame Verdoux’s great form and offered her his coveted ivory ring.

VIEW COLLECTION
  • NEW
    Madame Verdoux

    Madame Verdoux

  • NEW
    The Metropolis Revisited  Dining Table

    The Metropolis Revisited
    Dining Table

  • NEW
    Nanook of the North Midnight  Seat

    Nanook of the North Midnight
    Seat

  • NEW Ready-to-ship
    The Playhouse Cabinet

    The Playhouse
    Cabinet

  • NEW
    The Count Giusto Cabinet

    The Count Giusto
    Cabinet

  • NEW
    The Count Fumoso Cabinet

    The Count Fumoso
    Cabinet

  • NEW Ready-to-ship
    The General Giusto Study Table

    The General Giusto
    Study Table

  • NEW
    Napoleon Cabinet/Chest of Drawers

    Napoleon
    Cabinet/Chest of Drawers

 

THE VANILLA NOIR STORY

India's handicrafts are as multifarious as its cultures, and as rich as its history. The art of bone and horn inlay is omnipresent here. Artisans from the Northern region of Sarai Tarin, to Bengal in the East, and Trivandrum in the South, have imbibed the ancient technique from Himalayan tribes, and have made their own mark along the way. The intricately crafted combs, vases, toys, and other objets d'art have long been a connoisseur's delight, and a means of livelihood for millions.

When the founders of Scarlet Splendour and designer Matteo Cibic went on tour, in search of inspiration for their first collection, they were captivated by the exquisite bone marquetry. They decided to make a contemporary version of the playfully geometric designs, which would be accepted across the world. Cibic then developed a resin compound, and the company carried out trials with the material until they found the right mix. The resin would replicate ivory inlay, on a base of plywood, ultimately smoothened and lacquered to have no visible or tactile end. Each piece of the Vanilla Noir collection would then be made in India, by local craftsmen using locally sourced materials and pigments.

The aim was to combine Indian workmanship and Western aesthetic in such a way that each piece appears timeless, and with multiple roots. In the unique decorative imprints one would recognize Indian styles, and also unexpected drifts to Italian design. The company's founders wanted to proudly showcase the fine art and making capabilities of their native India, and give the craftsmen due recognition. They have successfully paid homage to their heritage by elevating indigenous art and taking it to global design platforms.